Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Awareness

Australian clinical and not-for-profit and BPD organisations are collaborating to raise awareness of the need for access to evidence-based treatment, expanding early diagnosis, and family education to promote resiliency and positive recovery for BPD.

BPD is a complex mental health disorder with symptoms commonly emerging during early adolescence and adulthood. BPD symptoms can be painful, debilitating, and isolating, and people with the disorder can be subject to discrimination and bias. Relationships, employment, and overall functioning can be impacted making the journey for those who live with BPD difficult.

BPD is a treatable condition and has a good long-term prognosis with good rates of recovery. Awareness, education, compassion and access to evidence-based treatment and services when they are needed, are critical to ensuring that people living with BPD and their families have the tools and support they need to achieve recovery.

Frank Quinlan, CEO Mental Health Australia

Mind Museum

Mind Museum

Art is emotion – please upload your ‘expression of emotion’ onto Instagram tagged with #bpdawarenessaustralia and it will automatically be showcased in our Mind Museum.  Your expression of emotion can be art in any form.

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What is BPD

What is BPD

Borderline Personality Disorder is a complex and serious mental illness.  With a range of evidence-based treatments, it now has good rates of recovery.

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Perspectives

Perspectives

People with the disorder, carers, and clinicians share their journeys and their messages of hope for recovery, in a personal video. Twelve beautiful videos are available for viewing.

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A New National Road Map for Australia

A New National Road Map for Australia

Written by one of Australia’s pre-eminent BPD Clinicians, this important paper outlines the current Australian BPD status, achievements and challenges moving forward.  We invite comment from our Australian BPD community.

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Spread the word - Take Action!

Spread the word - Take Action!

Please take one minute to send this ready made email to your Health Minister and Mental Health Commissioner. Together our voices can make a huge difference.

Simply click on a link here for your email and your contact.

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Mind Museum
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“BPD can turn my life upside down at times. It doesn’t define who I am, but it helps explain it.”
More than a quarter of a million Australians are known to suffer from BPD.
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What is BPD
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Life’s a rollercoaster for everyone. For those with BPD, it’s a rocket to the moon.
What is Borderline Personality Disorder?

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious mental illness marked by unstable moods, behavior, and relationships.

Because some people with severe BPD have brief psychotic episodes, experts originally thought of this illness as atypical, or borderline, versions of other mental disorders. While mental health experts now generally agree that the name “borderline personality disorder” is misleading, a more accurate term does not exist yet.

‘When you understand, you cannot help but love. You cannot get angry. To develop understanding, you have to practice looking … with the eyes of compassion. When you understand, you love. And when you love, you naturally act in a way that can relieve the suffering of people.”

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Perspectives

Catherine and Melanie Holland

Catherine is Melanie’s mum and together they talk about the benefits and challenges of receiving Melanie’s BPD diagnosis, and their journey through to recovery and a wonderful relationship. Melanie now works as a peer support worker, supporting others with the diagnosis and Catherine is a carer peer worker at HelpingMinds, a not-for-profit mental health services and carer support organisation. Catherine is also a Family Connections facilitator.

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Professor Andrew Chanen

Professor Andrew Chanen is a global authority on personality disorders including Borderline Personality Disorder. He is the Deputy Director of research at Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health; a Board Director of NEA.BPD Australia; and the Immediate Past President of the International Society for the Study of Personality Disorders.

Professor Chanen’s interests lie in prevention and early intervention for severe mental disorders, principally personality disorders, along with mood and psychotic disorders.

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Rose Cuff and Hannah Dee

Hannah Dee is a Melboure based Author, mother of three and a consumer advisor.

Rose Cuff is a statweide FaPMI (Families where a Parent has a Mental Illness ) coordinator, based at the Bouverie centre, Melbourne

They talk about what its like to be a single Mum with 3 children and BPD. Getting a diagnosis, acceptance of BPD, the triggers and understanding of BPD.

Being a better mother and conversations with your children.

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Hayley Peckham

Hayley Peckham shares her struggles and triumphs with BPD. She describes ‘neuroplasticity’ and explains it as how our brains are shaped by experience. She says neuroplasticity plays a role in both the cause and cure of BPD.

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National Road Map
Senate Motion for BPD Awareness Week
Downloadable PDF
Towards developing a National Strategy for Borderline Personality disorder- a dollar a citizen per year will get us started in the right direction
The objective of this paper is to trigger the commencement of a debate about developing a National Strategy for the management and treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The overarching objective is to make treatment accessible and available for every single person with BPD in Australia. We invite thoughts, comments, and feedback from the broader Australian BPD community. All information received will be acknowledged as part of BPD Awareness Week and will be fed into a broader process designed to create a national road map for BPD in Australia.
Downloadable PDF
“There is no BPD stereotype. There are 256 different, possible presentations of BPD.”
With effective treatment people with BPD can make great progress and recover. Important gains and improvements can be made in one year with appropriate treatment.
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Spread The Word
Personal Blogs

My Story

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Therapy doesn’t work! This is what I believed to my core until I started D.B.T four years ago I had suffered from severe depression, anxiety and insomnia from the age of 12. My parent’s never got any help for me and thought that leaving me alone in my bedroom to “sort out” my own problems would be the best way of helping me. Avoidance was another strategy they would use. If there were any stressful situations coming up at school they would simply keep me home. If I got too “worked up” my Mum would give me Panadol or valerian drops. I started seeing psychologists when I first moved out o…
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Fred's Journey

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  First off I would like to say I don’t like the term ‘Carer’, in mental health, as it gives the perspective of ‘doing for’ rather than ‘supporting’ . It is important to understand that as family members and friends that our role, primarily, is to support our loved ones in their recovery journey though there will be times when, due to acute unwellness, we will need to do things for our people. It is important to give back these responsibilities as soon as able so that they can maintain ownership of their recovery. Our journey began some 20 years ago when Cathy first overdosed which bega…
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Will's story

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In January 2012, two weeks after my discharge from a psychiatric hospital in Connecticut, I made a plan to die. My week in an acute care unit that had me on a suicide watch had not diminished my pain. Back in New York, I stormed out of my therapist’s office and declared I wouldn’t return to the treatment I’d dutifully followed for three decades. Nothing was working, so what was the point? I fit the demographic profile of the American suicide — white, male and entering middle age with a history of depression. Suicide runs in families, research tells us, and it ran in mine. My father killed h…
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The collaborative partners who have allied to bring this message to Australia: